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English, 21.06.2019 13:30 kyahshayovvu24

How does the author create a surprise ending? cite evidence from the text to support your answer.

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English, 21.06.2019 12:30
What effect does this excerpt have? the line of the horizon was clear and hard against the sky, and in one particular quarter it showed black against a silvery climbing [glow] that grew and grew. at last, over the rim of the waiting earth, the moon lifted with slow majesty till it swung clear of the horizon and rode off, free of *moorings; and once more they began to see surfaces—meadows wide-spread, and quiet gardens, and the river itself from bank to bank, all softly disclosed, all washed clean of mystery and terror, all radiant again as by day, but with a difference that was tremendous. their old haunts greeted them again in other *raiment, as if they had slipped away and put on this pure new apparel and come quietly back, smiling as they shyly waited to see if they would be recognized again under it. fastening their boat to a willow, the friends landed in this silent, silver kingdom, and patiently explored . . then a change began slowly to declare itself. the horizon became clearer, field and tree came more into sight, and somehow with a different look; the mystery began to drop away from them. a bird piped suddenly, and was still; and a light breeze sprang up . . rat . . sat up suddenly and listened with a passionate intentness. mole, who with gentle strokes was just keeping the boat moving while he scanned the banks with care, looked at him with curiosity.
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English, 21.06.2019 19:00
Modernist poetry broke traditions in works that did all of the following except: question 1 options: a) experimented with language, symbolism, and imagery b) challenged rules about point of view, rhyme scheme, meter, and capitalization c) focused on the poem’s appearance on the page as a form of self-expression d) addressed subjects and ideas that had been explored in poetry for centuries. while mr. flood is not heroic in the typical sense and does nothing admirable during the poem’s action, robinson’s description of mr. flood is nevertheless filled with pathos, which a) the poem is filled with language and descriptions which arouse emotion, usually pity and sympathy, from the reader. b) the poem is filled with nonsensical events that make the reader laugh at mr. flood’s expense. c) the poem gives vivid sensory details that make the reader feel like they are a part of the story. d) the poem is tedious and drawn out with details that don’t influence the reader at all. refer to the william carlos williams poem "spring and all" (on pages 306-7 in your textbook), to answer the prompt below. your response should be 1-2 well-developed paragraphs and should include specific details (quotes) from the poem that support your analysis. cite your textual evidence as well. you should use your journeys book. because “spring and all” ends with language and imagery that suggest birth and growth, many readers consider it a hopeful poem that celebrates the first steps toward new life and away from a wintry world characterized by death and decay. consider the poem’s date of publication—1923—and the historical events that influenced many modern writers, specifically, world war i. poem below: by the road to the contagious hospital under the surge of the blue mottled clouds driven from the northeast-a cold wind. beyond, the waste of broad, muddy fields brown with dried weeds, standing and fallen patches of standing water the scattering of tall trees all along the road the reddish purplish, forked, upstanding, twiggy stuff of bushes and small trees with dead, brown leaves under them leafless vines- lifeless in appearance, sluggish dazed spring approaches- they enter the new world naked, cold, uncertain of all save that they enter. all about them the cold, familiar wind- now the grass, tomorrow the stiff curl of wildcarrot leaf one by one objects are defined- it quickens: clarity, outline of leaf but now the stark dignity of entrance-still, the profound change has come upon them: rooted, they grip down and begin to awaken how might “spring and all” be interpreted as a reaction to the violence of world war 1? be sure to cite examples from the poem to support your analysis.
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English, 21.06.2019 20:10
Memories of a memory have you ever witnessed something amazing, shocking or surprising and found when describing the event that your story seems to change the more you tell it? have you ever experienced a time when you couldn't really describe something you saw in a way that others could understand? if so, you may understand why some experts think eyewitness testimony is unreliable as evidence in scientific inquiries and trials. new insights into human memory suggest human memories are really a mixture of many non-factual things. first, memory is vague. imagine your room at home or a classroom you see every day. most likely, you could describe the room very generally. you could name the color of the walls, the floors, the decorations. but the image you describe will never be as specific or detailed as if you were looking at the actual room. memory tends to save a blurry image of what we have seen rather than specific details. so when a witness tries to identify someone, her brain may recall that the person was tall, but not be able to say how tall when faced with several tall people. there are lots of different kinds of "tall." second, memory uses general knowledge to fill in gaps. our brains reconstruct events and scenes when we remember something. to do this, our brains use other memories and other stories when there are gaps. for example, one day at a library you go to quite frequently, you witness an argument between a library patron and one of the librarians. later, when telling a friend about the event, your brain may remember a familiar librarian behind the desk rather than the actual participant simply because it is recreating a familiar scene. in effect, your brain is combining memories to you tell the story. third, your memory changes over time. it also changes the more you retell the story. documented cases have shown eyewitnesses adding detail to testimony that could not have been known at the time of the event. research has also shown that the more a witness's account is told, the less accurate it is. you may have noticed this yourself. the next time you are retelling a story, notice what you add, or what your brain wants to add, to the account. you may also notice that you drop certain details from previous tellings of the story. with individual memories all jumbled up with each other, it is hard to believe we ever know anything to be true. did you really break your mother's favorite vase when you were three? was that really your father throwing rocks into the river with you when you were seven? the human brain may be quite remarkable indeed. when it comes to memory, however, we may want to start carrying video cameras if we want to record the true picture. part a and part b below contain one fill-in-the-blank to be used for all three question responses. your complete response must be in the format a, b, c including the letter choice, commas, and a space after the commas. part a: which of the following best explains why memories from childhood are unreliable? fill in blank 1 using a, b, or c. our brains add details and general knowledge to childhood memories. our brains are not as reliable as video cameras are. our brains create new stories to make the past more interesting. part b select one quotation from the text that supports your answer to part a. add your selection to blank 1 using e, f, or g. but the image you describe will never be as specific or detailed as if you were looking at the actual room. when a witness tries to identify someone, her brain may recall that the person was tall, but not be able to say how tall. to do this, our brains use other memories and other stories when there are gaps. select one quotation from the text that supports your answer to part a. add your selection to blank 1 using h, i, or j. documented cases have shown eyewitnesses adding detail to testimony that could not have been known at the time of the event. with individual memories all jumbled up with each other, it is hard to believe we ever know anything to be true. when it comes to memory, however, we may want to start carrying video cameras if we want to record the true picture answer for blank 1:
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English, 22.06.2019 03:00
Mr. underwood's editorial defending tom robinson is surprising because he's described as not wanting to be near negroes it's a dangerous stance to take at that time he had been neutral during the trial he wasn't in the courtroom
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How does the author create a surprise ending? cite evidence from the text to support your answer....
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